Your 2020 Guide on How to Get the Most Out of Video Marketing

Video Content Marketing Trends & Tips
In the past few years we’ve seen a massive increase in video content popping up online, and there’s no sign of it slowing down.

From creating webinars to putting short clips in emails, a video marketing strategy is a must if you want to truly engage with your audience in order to improve brand awareness and boost leads and sales.

According to Wyzowl, a company that creates animated explainer footage, 83% of marketers say video helps them with lead generation, and 87% say it has increased traffic to their website.

Some other benefits include:

  • It’s good for SEO. If your stuff is compelling enough to attract views and shares, your Google search ranking can improve.
  • It’s a timesaver. It doesn’t take long to create short yet engaging clips in comparison to writing an article or blog.
  • It’s affordable. It can be more cost-effective to create a short clip vs. producing an ad or a blog.
  • It gets attention. People may scroll through written words, but most will at least give a glance to interesting footage.

As we head into 2020, here are three video content marketing trends you can expect to see going forward.

  1. Vertical videos. Just when everyone seemed to get the memo that horizontal filming is best, vertical videos come along! This is because consumers watch a lot of things on smartphones.

Instagram and Snapchat were the first to utilize vertical videos in Stories, and Instagram Television (IGTV) was next.

Even Netflix uses vertical digital marketing videos to showcase previews.

  1. Live streaming. This refers to anything that is recorded and broadcast in real time. People like to feel like they’re being spoken to directly and authentically, and live streaming is also a low-cost way to produce collateral.

We’ve seen more and more social platforms implement this functionality, including Instagram Live, Facebook Live, Twitter Live and LinkedIn for a select few.

  1. In-video shopping. So far, it seems to be largely clothing retailers who are leveraging this tactic. How it works: Users can click on a section of the screen (say, a skirt on a model) and be directed to the link to buy the item.

A recent survey by Brightcove revealed that 23% of consumers overall and 30% of Millennials want links that let them directly purchase a product.

Now that you’ve got an idea of what’s going to be popular in 2020, here are some ways to incorporate engaging footage into your campaigns this year.

  1. Use your landing pages.

A survey by marketing technology company Eyeview showed that video on landing pages can increase conversions by 86%. It’s a great way to increase search rankings, as Google’s algorithms are increasingly prioritizing websites with this type of content.

Other advantages: It can lead to more social shares, build trust and awareness and reduce bounce rate.

Shopify created an inspirational brand montage that lives on their homepage. It explains what they do, highlights different customers and announces they now support one million businesses.

  1. Blogs and articles.

Did you know blog posts can be just as valuable as a landing page? Think about filming your post instead of writing it (or do both), and you’ve easily increased the odds of that info reaching more visitors.

Moz, which is considered an SEO authority, found that showing a clip with blog images and text increased reach by 3X.

One of our clients, Financial Recovery Institute, uses it in a blog to tell a story.

  1. Emails and newsletters.

The digital marketing videos you create will depend on your objectives and goals. For example, are you announcing a new product, an event, or a course you want people to sign up for?

You could also use email to give people a sneak peek of longer footage on your website. Once you’ve decided what you’re promoting, you can begin shooting.

Something to note: There are over 30 major email clients, including Microsoft Outlook, Gmail, Yahoo Mail and Apple Mail. Some of them don’t support the requirements for using clips in emails.

Several of the popular email newsletter services like AWeber and MailChimp make it simple to share what you film by using a screen capture and linking the image to the original content.

That way, a user can just click on the image in the email and be directed to your clip. Want to learn more? Check out our recommended email newsletter providers.

  1. Social media platforms.

A solid social media strategy is essential, and you only need to glance at your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or LinkedIn feed (and of course YouTube and Pinterest) to see how big a role video plays for companies.

Some formats you could shoot for social media include:

  • How-to guides
  • Q&As
  • Behind-the-scenes glimpses
  • Events
  • Interviews
  • Unboxings (if you have a physical product)

It’s important to remember that each social media platform has rules around how long your digital marketing videos can be. Here’s a quick reference guide:

  • Facebook allows you up to 240 minutes (though you probably wouldn’t want to use all that time),
  • Twitter provides 2 minutes and 20 seconds.
  • Instagram gives you one minute if shared as a post, 15 seconds as a story and up to 1 hour as a live or IGTV video.
  • LinkedIn has a 10-minute limit.
  • Snapchat allows 10 seconds.

Make sure your videos are optimized for each social media platform. Viewers on Instagram expect different things than those on Twitter, for example.

We can’t possibly cover every platform or video content marketing strategy out there, but I hope this has given you some ideas on how to use this valuable tool in 2020.

Remember: No matter what you’re creating or selling, it’s all about storytelling. It’s time to tell the most authentic and compelling stories you can about your products or services!

And if your organization needs help with social media marketing, it’s best to find a qualified service provider who understands the specific nuances of the different social channels and what works best on each.

How Should A General Practice Respond In The Face Of A Pandemic?

What is a pandemic and what are the signs that one is occurring?

A pandemic is when a disease spreads quickly and affects a large number of people. There are usually warning signs that a pandemic is occurring, such as an increase in the number of cases of the disease, or when the disease starts spreading to new parts of the world.

The Covid-19 pandemic in recent times is a good example of a pandemic which has spread to almost the entire world, and is to this day causing a lot of deaths, as well as infections.

What can be done to prevent the spread of a pandemic and protect those who are at risk?

When a pandemic hits, everyone needs to be aware of it and take the right precautions to prevent themselves from becoming infected. General practices can play a vital role in educating people about the risks of pandemics and how to protect themselves. They can also provide support to other health care workers who may be struggling during this time.

There are a few things that general practice owners can do to help prevent the spread of a pandemic, and protect those who are at risk:

Develop a plan. According to practice management consultants, this should include what procedures you will put in place, how you will communicate with your staff and patients, and what supplies you will need.
Educate your staff about the risks of pandemics, and train them on how to spot the signs and symptoms of an infection. They need to be able to identify patients who may be infected, so they can be isolated and treated.
Stockpile supplies such as masks, gloves, hand sanitizer, and disinfectant wipes. You may also want to consider stocking up on prescription medications and medical supplies.
Restrict visitors. During a pandemic, it is important to limit the number of people who come into your office. This will help reduce the risk of exposure to infection.
Stay informed. Keep up to date on the latest information about the pandemic, and share any updates with your staff.
Be prepared to close your practice if necessary. If conditions worsen and you are unable to safely provide care, you may need to temporarily close your office.

While general practices should take these steps to protect themselves during a pandemic, they also have an important role in supporting other health care workers. They can do this by:

Providing training for other health care workers on how to spot the signs and symptoms of an infection.
Make sure you have a plan for dealing with an influx of patients, should the need arise. Have enough staff available to deal with increased demand, and make sure they are trained in proper infection control procedures.
Have sufficient infrastructure in place in case you need to isolate your staff or patients.
Make sure you have an adequate supply of medical supplies and equipment to deal with a potential pandemic.

What resources are available to help manage a pandemic situation effectively and safely for all involved parties?

Every country will have many resources that they share with related parties, especially those in health care, as well as with each other. Through organisations such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN), and Health Cluster, a great deal of sharing and mobilising of resources takes place during an emergency. In addition, each country will have its own national health authorities who can offer guidance on what to do locally. They can also help with co-ordinating international support if it is required.

The organisations will provide a range of information and guidelines that need to be followed during such a time, including general guidelines as well as more specific information for different types of organisations such as hospitals or schools.

One of the most important aspects of overcoming a pandemic is knowledge sharing. As soon as a potential pandemic is identified, the World Health Organisation (WHO) will work with other global health organisations to share information on the virus and how it spreads. This sharing of information enables countries to prepare for an outbreak and helps to ensure that any response is coordinated. In times of crisis, good communication between all parts of the health system is essential. The international network of disaster management centres can help with this by coordinating resources and providing support where needed.

The role of governments during a pandemic is also critical. They need to ensure that laws are in place to protect people from the virus and that necessary resources are available. Governments also need to work with agencies such as the WHO so that they can be aware of the latest updates and take the necessary steps to prevent the spread of the disease.

Direct Marketing Mythbusters: “Build It and They Will Come” (What a Big Fat Lie)

“Doing business without advertising is like winking at a girl in the dark. You know what you are doing but nobody else does.”

Steuart Henderson Britt

It’s worth noting that when Costner was advised to ‘build it’ the ‘they who came’ were not paying customers, they were moochers -none of the dead ball players actually paid to use the baseball field. Nobody in the movie paid to watch them play. So if you aren’t in the business of making money then build it and they will come makes perfect sense.

For some reason there is a belief that just building a product is enough to drive customers to your door. I don’t know why this came about – but for now I am going to blame Field of Dreams – although for some reason I suspect this happened before 1989.

“Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door” – incorrectly attributed to Ralph Waldo Emmerson in the late 1800′s. So the myth has been around a while and if I was a more diligent student I could find something earlier.

However, if you are genuinely in the business of making money then you need customers. Nobody or nothing else can give you money.

And marketing is the art of getting and keeping customers. So best we spend some money on marketing rather than on building it or making that better mousetrap.

Personally, I don’t really care how good the product is, unless someone buys it, and you make money on the transaction. So yes you need a good product but you also need to be able to sell the product in sufficient volume to make money.

Drayton Bird is fond of saying something along the lines of “Great marketing of a bad product will only kill it faster.” The product lingers on long after the glow of the great marketing has subsided.

Build it and they will come/ build a better mousetrap is more about cart before the horse, in the world of making money.

You need to know you can and be able to sell the thing before you ever make it or waste precious dollars on product development. Generally speaking, there are millions of people who can make and a relatively few who know how to sell. The selling of the product is the hard part. Best figure that part out first.

Once you know how to sell your product, then the making part is easier. The added bonus is, if you find out in the sales and marketing testing phase there are benefits and features you need to add to the product that your market wants then you don’t need to go and rebuild the product from scratch.

It’s much easier just to build an product the market wants in the first place.

Build it and they will come: Myth Busted.